Pirandello’s The Giants of the Mountain

Pirandello’s The Giants of the Mountain

Theaterlab, New York City.

On October 15, 2013 the Pirandello Society of America sponsored a reading I adapted and directed of Pirandello’s The Giants of the Mountain, with nine actors and two visual artists, who took turns at drawing the characters so precisely described by the author’s stage directions. The play is a “myth” between fable and reality that Pirandello continued to imagine, write, and rework from 1929 to 1934, but eventually left unfinished despite encouraging contracts with American impresarios. Yet, in its present form, the play vibrates with the powerful contradictions of sublime Art torn between the inner necessity to reach out to spectators who may not understand it and the temptation to abandon the world altogether. It was, in the playwright’s opinion, the culmination of his artistic endeavors.

The reading took place at Theaterlab and it was part of the series “NOT Made in Italy – Creativity as Displacement” and of the celebrations for the Year of Italian Culture in the United States.

For the evening’s program, click here.
A review was published by PSA, the journal of the Pirandello Society: you can read it here

 

 

Here are some of the drawings “performed” during the evening:

 

The Liar by Carlo Goldoni

The Liar by Carlo Goldoni

Kline Theatre, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA.

The Theatre Arts Department at Gettysburg College asked me to direct a mainstage production during the 2008-09 season. Thus, I adapted and translated the play into English in collaboration with Susan Russell, Chair and Professor of Theater Arts. The action was set in contemporary Venice Beach, California and the Italian aristocracy was transformed into its American counterpart based on wealth.

Also, in line with Goldoni’s biography, I imagined that the playwright himself was writing in a haste, in order to keep his promise of delivering as many as 16 new comedies during a single season, and thus win a bet against his competitors. Since everything was being created on the spot, the actors received their parts page after page and the set itself was brought in piece by piece and moved around as the play developed. You can read more in my director’s notes here.

Since we were dealing with lying at its “best”, I asked each member of the production to write a biographical note with a twist, and include a half lie and a full-blown one. You can read the entire program here: try to find the lies! Some are really funny and you can probably tell without knowing the person directly.

Alexis by Marguerite Yourcenar

Alexis by Marguerite Yourcenar

S. Giovanni Bosco Theatre, Modena, and San Martino Theatre, Bologna, Italy

By special arrangement with the Yourcenar Estate, I presented this monologue within the context of the “La manica tagliata” (The Cut Sleeve) LGBT festival, with Francesco Stella as the protagonist. Since the piece is particularly long, it offered a challenging field for experimentation in the areas of dramaturgy, storytelling, and composition.

La Traviata (from Giuseppe Verdi and Alexandre Dumas)

La Traviata (from Giuseppe Verdi and Alexandre Dumas)

Teatro del Tempo, Parma, Italy

For this dinner theatre show, I combined scenes from Verdi’s opera and Dumas’s Camille (La Dame aux camélias), with music played by an ensemble directed by Alessandro Nidi (Parma Conservatory). Two sets of performers, four actors and three singers, led the audience into the depths of passion as seen through the different conventions of spoken and musical theatre. The show had a lot of coverage in the newspapers and on TV since it was held during the year of the celebrations for the first centenary of Verdi’s death.

Read a series of articles published by the newspaper Gazzetta di Parma including a glowing review by Valeria Ottolenghi here. (in Italian, translations coming soon…)

Here is an 11 minute promotional video of the show:

 

 

The Two Gentlemen of Verona (from Shakespeare)

The Two Gentlemen of Verona (from Shakespeare)

Teatro del Tempo, Parma, Italy.

I was called by Numeriprimi, a company of young actors who had just graduated from a professional course supported by the European Union. I chose The Two Gentlemen of Verona based both on the composition of the group and the script’s opportunities for physical theater. Each song is a Shakespearean sonnet, translated into Italian. With original music by Marco Caronna, played by Luca Savazzi, the show came to resemble a musical.

 

 

Below you find both an 8 minute promo video and the two parts of the full show:

Promo

Part 1

Part 2

Tie Up That Shakespeare! (Shakespeare da legare)

Tie Up That Shakespeare! (Shakespeare da legare)

Teatro del Battito and Teatro della Memoria, Milan, Italy.
Piccolo Teatro Caligola, Aversa, Naples, Italy.

For a while I collaborated with an energetic company of young actors, I Mercenari in Milan, Italy. This show took its title from the fact that many scenes from different plays were tied together in the context of an asylum, which gave us a lot of freedom in experimenting. The show had quite a few versions adapted for different types of venues, from regular theatres to outdoor settings and dinner theatres.

Even with all the Bard’s words, the most impressive scene remained the final silent one, where all the performers gradually wrapped themselves up as a group in a long yellow sheet. Here is where I came to fully realize the power and intensity of pure images.

 

 

Macbeth (from Shakespeare)

Macbeth (from Shakespeare)

Franco Parenti Theatre, Milan, Italy

My MFA diploma production with the actors of the School of Dramatic Art “Paolo Grassi”. I emphasized Malcolm’s story and the theme of free will. The video of the performance was later shown at Centro Festival del Teatro d’Europa, Palazzo Reale, Milan.

 

 

 

The Tragedy of Noble Antony (from Shakespeare)

The Tragedy of Noble Antony (from Shakespeare)

School of Dramatic Art “Paolo Grassi” – Sala Colonne, Milan, Italy

In this dramaturgy of two of Shakespeare’s Roman plays, scenes from Julius Caesar and Anthony and Cleopatra explored Antony’s character in its entirety. Three male actors played all the roles including Cleopatra and the Roman mob, and this brought about many inventive solutions in a mixture of tragedy and comic moments.